Current git branch in shell prompt

Since I”ve read much about git and how great it is, I recently thought that I had to try it myself. And indeed, it is quite amazing and is nice to work with. There was one thing that I disliked, though: I never quite knew in which branch of my repository I was, especially after I”ve been away from coding for a few hours.
Of course I could just look that up, but I tend to forget that and then end up with code that belongs to a different branch. Now the shell prompt looked like a good place to show the current branch, but simply executing “git branch | grep ^*” would only work in the top-level directory of the repository. So I wrote the following function which will traverse all containing directories and look for a .git directory. Having found one, it will nicely print the the branch in dark green color, with a @ sign in front of it:

Update: As many people have pointed out, bash-completion provides a function called __git_ps1 which will happily print the current git branch and can be used as well. I don”t quite like the rest of bash-completion, though, so I”ll stick with my own.
As Yuri pointed out, git branch works from any directory, so here”s the updated (and much shorter ๐Ÿ™‚ ) version:

Having this in my .bashrc, I could integrate it quite nicely with my prompt:

Screenshot:
git prompt

16 thoughts on “Current git branch in shell prompt

  1. jonner

    the git bash-completion scripts come with a prebuilt (and more fully-featured) way to do this. It””ll even show you if you””re in the middle of a rebase, etc. Do a google search for __git_ps1

  2. Yury G. Kudryashov

    git branch works from any directory inside git work tree.

    Another solution:
    if [[ git rev-parse --is-inside-work-tree 2>/dev/null == “true” ]]; then
    git branch | grep ””^*”” | sed -e ””s/*/@/””
    fi

  3. js

    Better use:

    git branch –no-color 2>/dev/null | sed ””-nes/^*[[:space:]]*//p””

  4. Diederik van der Boor

    If you have the git bash-completion scripts installed, take a look at the $__git_ps1 function. Yours is pretty simple and clean ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. Stefan Bรถhmann

    Git already has a number of such small helpers. All this scripts starts with a __git prefix. One of them is __git_ps1 which meets approximately the same purpose as your formattedGitBranch.

  6. Johan Herland

    If you have Git””s Bash-completion installed (and enabled), you can get away MUCH more easily, since it already provides a “__git_ps1″ function. Here””s a snippet from my .bashrc:

    # Show Git branch in bash prompt
    export GIT_PS1_SHOWDIRTYSTATE=1
    export PS1=””[33[01;32m]u@h[33[00m] [33[01;34m]w[33[00m]$(__git_ps1 ” [33[01;33m](%s)[33[00m]”) $ ””

    In any case, even if you don””t have Git””s Bash-completion, your formattedGitBranch() function is not efficient. A much more efficient way to determine your current branch name is simply:

    git rev-parse –symbolic –abbrev-ref $(git symbolic-ref HEAD 2> /dev/null)

    Have fun! ๐Ÿ™‚

    …Johan

  7. metlos

    Git already has that functionality somewhat included. Here””s a snippet from my .bashrc for having the git or svn branch in the prompt (note also that the git-completion.bash will give you bash completion of git branches and other goodies):

    GIT_VERSION=rpm -q --qf "%{VERSION}" git

    . /usr/share/doc/git-“$GIT_VERSION”/contrib/completion/git-completion.bash

    parse_svn_url() {
    svn info 2>/dev/null | grep -e ””^URL*”” | sed -e ””s#^URL: *(.*)#1#g ””
    }
    parse_svn_repository_root() {
    svn info 2>/dev/null | grep -e ””^Repository Root:*”” | sed -e ””s#^Repository Root: *(.*)#1/#g ””
    }

    parse_svn_branch() {
    parse_svn_url | sed -e ””s#^”””$(parse_svn_repository_root)”””##g”” | awk -F / ””{print ” svn:” $0}””
    }

    PS1=””[u@h W[33[01;32m]$(__git_ps1 ” git:%s”)$(parse_svn_branch)[33[00m]]$ ””

  8. metlos

    hmm… strange… replace all the double-double quotes with single quotes in the above…

  9. Dominik H

    I have the following in my .bashrc. It””s the same as yours, but with an additional smily ๐Ÿ™‚ if the return code of the last app was 0, and a smily ๐Ÿ™ if it was !=0 ๐Ÿ™‚

    # git branching
    function formattedGitBranch {
    checkDir=”$PWD”

    # check whether we””””re in a git repository
    while [[ “$checkDir” != “/” ]]; do
    if [[ -d “$checkDir/.git” ]]; then
    GIT_DIR=$(cd “$checkDir/.git”; git branch | grep “^*” | sed -e “s/^*//”)
    echo -n -e “@e[0;32m$GIT_DIR ”
    return 0
    fi
    checkDir=$(readlink -f “$checkDir/..”)
    done

    return 1
    }

    # use a fancy prompt ๐Ÿ™‚
    PS1=”[33[01;32m]u@h[33[00m]:[33[01;34m]w[33[00m]”
    PS1=”$PS1 if [ $? = 0 ]; then formattedGitBranch; echo -e ''''[33[01;32m]:)'''';"
    PS1="$PS1 else formattedGitBranch; echo -e ''''[33[01;31m]:(''''; fi
    [33[00m] $ ”
    export PS1

  10. Carl-Erwin

    If you use bash_completion scripts
    do this

    . /etc/bash_completion
    export PS1=””u@h:w $(__git_ps1 “(%s)”)n$ ””

    Have fun

  11. Benedikt

    I use zsh, because of the _really_ nice completion features and this is possible in zsh too.
    If you want to try it out, I””m using the .zshrc from http://grml.org/zsh/ which does some really neat things

  12. Rรฉmy

    a “” is missing in front of the call of the function in the prompt. Should be …$(formattedGitBranch)…

  13. Rรฉmy

    I meant a backslash was missing, but thoose caracters seem to be “swallowed” when printed in the comments.

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